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I felt very good yesterday, for the most part, but today there are thunderstorms moving across the state, and they seem to be dragging my mood along with them. Often, I would like to believe that my emotions exist somehow beyond neurological biochemistry and a host of external stimuli, that my mental illnesses have a greater "meaning" than these causes, but I can never manage that superstitious trick. Where would that mean they exist? I am not a "spiritual" or religious person, obviously. "Mind" is only a function of the brain, and the brain reacting with a myriad of other biological and environmental factors. And, likely, what I feel now is no more than the storms, the nightmares I had last night, my aching feet, bad memories, and so forth. That's why I have my pills. because we are always haunted, to quote Imp and to paraphrase Poe (Anne Decatur Danielewski, not Edgar Allan).

Anyway...

A good day for comments, if you have anything to say. Though, please don't attempt to engage me in arguments/dialogues about the mind/body dualism, philosophy of the mind, or anything of that sort. You'll only make things on this end much, much worse. And, in response, I won't be nice. I'd like to be nice today.

---

Yesterday's follow-up mission to Sunday's incomplete mission, or Bear Hunt #2, had mixed and curious results. On the one hand, we found the "bear fountain" (photos behind the cut). But, it turns out it wasn't sculpted by Eli Harvey, as I'd been led to believe by one of Charles R. Knight's letters, but by a German sculptor. This is easier if I quote a website at Brown University:

When Faunce House was built, a bear fountain was installed in the courtyard. A present from Theodore Francis Green 1887, who had promoted the bear as Brown’s mascot, the bear is a bronze replica of one which he found presiding over a fountain in Breslau, Germany. Green made arrangements with the German sculptor, Professor Ernest Moritz Geyger, to cast a replica of the bear for Brown.

Also, Brown University's website on the bear sculptures claims there are only four on campus (we've yet to see the "Kodiak" or the "Maddock Alumni Bear." And yet, Charles R. Knight writes, in a letter to Henry Fairfield Osborn, the following:

...Now that Brown [University] has eight brown bears done by Mr. [Eli] Harvey...

i can only conclude, though it seems somewhat unlikely, that Knight was mistaken about the provenance of all but one of the Brown University bears (the "Kodiak" is actually a taxidermied mount and the "Maddock" bear was sculpted by Nicholas Swearer, and both date from the 1940s, twenty years after Knight's letter to Osborn). So, we have a Bear Mystery. I may write a letter to Knight's estate and another to Brown University, to try and solve this. But it's hard to believe that Knight was mistaken about Harvey having done eight bears, if he'd only done one.

After our second bear hunt, we had sushi at Tokyo on Wickenden Street. Later, we made a HUGE batch of guacamole.

And here are photos from yesterday:





This is what happens to the pit of a mango when you wait a little too long to eat it.



The Geyger bear, on Magee Street. I found the water squirting from its nose a grotesquely amusing feature.



A profile of the Geyger bear.



Detail of the head.



Tokyo.

All photographs Copyright © 2012 by Caitlín R. Kiernan and Kathryn A. Pollnac



Seeking Mercy,
Aunt Beast

Comments

( 31 comments — Have your say! )
witchchild
Aug. 28th, 2012 05:50 pm (UTC)
If that were not a sprouted mango seed I'd start questioning the location of Cthulhu's home reputed as being underwater.
greygirlbeast
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:15 pm (UTC)

Alas, only a mango seed.
(no subject) - witchchild - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:17 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - greygirlbeast - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:21 pm (UTC) - Expand
ardentdelirium
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:07 pm (UTC)
that is the best bear ever.
greygirlbeast
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:15 pm (UTC)

Well. It's likely one of the funniest.
(no subject) - ardentdelirium - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:17 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - greygirlbeast - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:19 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - ardentdelirium - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:22 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - greygirlbeast - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:32 pm (UTC) - Expand
sovay
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:08 pm (UTC)
A good day for comments, if you have anything to say.

If you have not already seen the work of Beth Cavener Stichter, rushthatspeaks sent me the link with an express note that you should.

This is what happens to the pit of a mango when you wait a little too long to eat it.

For years, my mother had a lychee tree that she had grown from a pit. She kept it in a large terra-cotta pot, through several apartments and several moves, until it was trustingly loaned out to my elementary school to provide backdrop foliage for some kind of stage production; whoever was in charge of watering it forgot and it died. I am not sure she ever forgave the school for that.

I found the water squirting from its nose a grotesquely amusing feature.

"The Snarfing Bear" sounds like something from MST3K.
greygirlbeast
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:17 pm (UTC)

Wow! Very impressed by Beth Cavener Stichter. Thank you.
(no subject) - sovay - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:22 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - greygirlbeast - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:24 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - sovay - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:41 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - greygirlbeast - Aug. 28th, 2012 06:44 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - sovay - Aug. 28th, 2012 07:03 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - greygirlbeast - Aug. 28th, 2012 07:15 pm (UTC) - Expand
(Deleted comment)
greygirlbeast
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:20 pm (UTC)

Love the tongue.

It is an amazing tongue.

Also -- totally unrelated -- are you still playing Rift?

Yup.

Any interest in Guild Wars 2?

None whatsoever.
p_m_cryan
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:26 pm (UTC)
The word "Kodiak", whether spoken or written, still has the power to tickle my fancy and send chills down my spine.

I knew someone stationed on Kodiak Island with the Coast Guard in the mid-1980's, and the strange remoteness and hollow sounds of those phone calls made me yearn for a different kind of far-flung-ness than my dream to visit the stars.
greygirlbeast
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:31 pm (UTC)

The word "Kodiak", whether spoken or written, still has the power to tickle my fancy and send chills down my spine.

It's a nice word.
(Deleted comment)
greygirlbeast
Aug. 28th, 2012 06:32 pm (UTC)

I was not ready for the water going through the bear's nose.

Nor was I.
alumiere
Aug. 28th, 2012 07:15 pm (UTC)
The bear pictures made me snort my juice - totally unexpected nose fountains. I'm not sure that was a good thing but at least I laughed.

And I finally got started reading my recent package from Subpress. The Yellow Book is as bow tie inside as it is in form.
greygirlbeast
Aug. 28th, 2012 07:17 pm (UTC)

The bear pictures made me snort my juice - totally unexpected nose fountains.

Two nose fountains.

The Yellow Book is as bow tie inside as it is in form.

Thank you.
vrykolakes
Aug. 28th, 2012 07:36 pm (UTC)
When I was a kid I used to hide between the rows of bedsheets that my mom would hang out to dry on the clothesline. It was especially fun to be in the "fort" when a storm would roll in. The sound of the fabric whipping back and forth in the wind, the smell of fresh rain---simply wonderful.
ashlyme
Aug. 28th, 2012 07:40 pm (UTC)
I pity that bear, but only so much.Will you be planting the mango?

Beth Cavener Stichter is pretty damn amazing.
opalblack
Aug. 28th, 2012 07:48 pm (UTC)
That bear is wonderful.
elmocho
Aug. 28th, 2012 07:58 pm (UTC)
That bear has reached an advanced degree of Neti.

I've been reading this book because the author has long studied sleep and dreams and their relation to mental health. So far, the chapter on how REM sleep relates to depression was far too short, and I'm not sure how relevant the rest of it is to my interests. I'd been curious about those intersections before, and particularly after a diagnoses of severe obstructive sleep apnea.

Given your writing about dreamsickness, parts of it have reminded me of you, but the whole thing feels just a little too cursory.
whiskeychick
Aug. 28th, 2012 08:05 pm (UTC)
I find the water squirting out of the nose amusing, too.

Since my deprogramming began in June of 2011 (what I call my leap from corporate-hood to artist life), I have noticed a huge connection between my moods and the environmental factors. Alas, we are still beasts with very animalistic tendencies.
Julian Morrison
Aug. 29th, 2012 12:33 am (UTC)
I experience weather in my emotions, too. Sun makes me happy, unless it's too bright. Grim overcast I hate. Storms, I love. The brown light and humid hot tense sense of expectancy before a thunderstorm makes me want to dance in it.
( 31 comments — Have your say! )