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Yesterday, I wrote an absolutely pathetic 511 words, which may or may not be viable, and I'm left wondering who will murder me first, my agent or my editor. Either way, they would be rendering upon my person a spot of mercy. To quote the astoundingly sexy and well-armed Zoe Washburne.

It wasn't a good day. The best I can say is that it didn't become a violently bad day.

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It isn't often I say, "Go forth ye pilgrims and read THIS!" But, if you haven't, you should have a look at José Oliver and Bartolo Torres' Young Lovecraft. I've just finished the first collection, but I believe much of the strip is online. It's like Peanuts for creepy people, with just a dash of perversion. My thanks to oldfossil59 for introducing me to the comic. By the way, I'm actually a much greater admirer of comic "strips" than I am of comic books and graphic novels.

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Approximately 30% of the snag in yesterday's writing was my inability to locate a certain passage in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Finally, I put down my Riverside Shakespeare and resorted to the interwebs. Still no luck, but I did discover a remarkable peculiarity. This following sentence recurs perhaps hundreds of times on perhaps hundreds of websites, beginning (for me) with Wikipedia:

Disassociating himself from such evils may be why Oberon, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, carefully observed that neither he nor his court feared the church bells.

It's never sourced, though I believe Wikipedia attributes the sentiment/observation to some or another book on fairies. I'd call this an astounding instance of plagiarism, but we are talking about the internet.

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Anyway, if you've not yet ordered a copy of Confessions of a Five-Chambered Heart, or, for that matter, The Drowning Girl: A Memoir, well, why the hell are you hanging around here. I mean, um, please do. Order them. Thank you.

In closing, today's advice: Everyone is out to fuck you over, and never dare believe otherwise.

Otherwise,
Aunt Beast

Comments

sovay
Aug. 12th, 2012 07:08 pm (UTC)
It's never sourced, though I believe Wikipedia attributes the sentiment/observation to some or another book on fairies.

It's a condensation of some statements made by C.S. Lewis in The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature (1964). Discussing various theories on the nature of fairies:

"(4) That they are fallen angels; in other words, devils. This bcomes almost the official view after the accession of James I. 'That kind of Devils conversing in the earth', he says (Daemonologie, III, i) 'may be divided in foure different kindes . . . the fourth is these kinde of spirites that are called vulgarlie the Fayrie'. Burton includes among terrestrial devils 'Lares, Genii, Fauns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs, Foliots, Fairies, Robin Good-fellow, Trulli, etc.'

"This view, which is closely connected with the later Renaissance phobia about witches, goes far to explain the degradation of the Fairies from their medieval vitality into the kickshaws of Drayton or William Browne. A churchyard or brimstone smell came to hang about any treatment of them which was not obviously playful. Shakespeare may have had practical as well as poetic reasons for making Oberon assure us that he and his fellows are 'spirits of another sort' than those who have to vanish at daybreak (Dream, III, ii, 388). One might have expected the High Fairies to have been expelled by science; I think they were actually expelled by a darkening of superstition."

Edited at 2012-08-12 07:09 pm (UTC)
greygirlbeast
Aug. 12th, 2012 07:18 pm (UTC)

Gods, I knew I should have written you yesterday. Spooky evens aid so. I knew all this, only I couldn't find the line in Midsummer, even after reading all of Orberon's bits.

Thanks...
sovay
Aug. 12th, 2012 07:21 pm (UTC)
I knew all this, only I couldn't find the line in Midsummer, even after reading all of Oberon's bits.

Yeah. The internet sucks. There is nothing about church bells in the actual play.

Thanks...

No problem. Let me know if there's anything else I can do.
eredien
Aug. 13th, 2012 05:57 am (UTC)
I recently read a truly, truly excellent book of transcribed oral Irish folktales about fairies, I believe there may have been a chapter of stories specifically about fairy interaction with Christian church belief and artifact:


Title: Meeting the other crowd : the fairy stories of hidden Ireland
Author: Lenihan, Edmund.
ISBN: 9781585422067
eredien
Aug. 13th, 2012 05:50 am (UTC)
One might have expected the High Fairies to have been expelled by science; I think they were actually expelled by a darkening of superstition.

Thank you for this amazing quote.