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slower than dial-up at Xmas

I did a very satisfying 1,105 words on Chapter One of Daughter of Hounds yesterday. All it took was realizing that the book did not begin with Emmie on a school bus, but, rather, with Deacon and Emmie sitting together inside Kingston Station, waiting on the train that will take Emmie to Manhattan to visit Sadie. Once I realized that I was trying to start the book in the wrong place, the words came in a veritable flood. This chapter has a bit of a different voice than what I'm accustomed to seeing from myself. My work these last few years has seen a gradual shift away from the more baroque style that characterized, oh, say Silk and Tales of Pain and Wonder. But the language yesterday was even simpler, very straightforward, and I think a lot of this is because of Emmie. Spooky likes it a great deal. We'll see how it goes. Regardless, I am relieved, and I now understand where Chapter One is headed.

As we near frelling Xmas, my weekend dial-up connection gets increasingly lousy. All the Idiots charging shit on credit that they'll still be paying off next Xmas, for fear of not being part of the pack. Okay, maybe "idiot" is too strong a word. Then again, maybe it's not. It took me forever this morning just to read the new installment of The Adventures of Boschen and Nesuko. Screw you, Santa Claus, and the reindeer you rode in on.

A good enough Kid Night last night, though. We watached I, Robot, which I resisted seeing at the theatre, even though Alex Proyas has long been one of my favorite directors. Now I see that I had the right instinct. This was no more an Alex Proyas film than it was an adaptationn of Isaac Asimov's novel. The film does a complete one-eighty from the message of Asimov's I, Robot, declaring that we would be perfectly justified to fear the "rise of the machines." In truth, I, Robot, the movie, is a Will Smith action film, and that's really all it is. And that's not all bad. He's still sexy and charming as hell and occassionally funny and, less occassionally, effective in dramatic moments. The film's futuristic visuals are pretty and dazzling, but not nearly as effective as, say, the futuristic visuals of far better recent films, such as Minority Report and A.I.. As an adaptation of Asimov, the film fails utterly. As an Alex Proyas film, it baffles. As a another excuse for Will Smith to say, "Oh, hell no!</i>", it's pretty good. I laughed. Why this doesn't anger me the way SFC's adaptation of LeGuin's Earthsea books does, I'm not sure. Maybe it's because I can tell that Proyas at least tried, and since Asimov is no longer with us, I know he can't personally be offended at how someone could so entirely pervert what he was trying to say. Anyway, second feature was the utterly laughable Dracula 3000, featuring Coolio as a goofy pothead vampire. This movie is so incredibly awful it just suddenly stops. It doesn't end, it just stops. I'm not sure if they ran out of money or just figured they should stop before it got any stupider. Basically, Dracula in space. More I will not say. It's too dumb to repeat. But not so awful as some of our previous Kid-Night selections, such unwatchable fare as The Fangleys and Leeches. Had we been stoned, it might have been harmless dumb fun, instead of just dumb. After the movies, Spooky played a little Otogi 2, which is her thing right now, and then I played Halo 2, but made myself go to bed at 2:30 a.m. So, I'm a little more awake today.

It's weird that I've almost stopped going to the theatre. Partly, it's the way audiences have gotten. Partly, it's the absurdity of ticket prices. Partly, it's fear of communicable disease. And partly, it's the realization that I enjoy most films more on DVD at home. But I am being sorely tempted by a few at the moment: Blade: Trinity, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, and The Aviator are all trying to lure me out into the aforementioned crowds of shopping idiots. In the old days, when I was seeing two or three movies a week, I'd have paid full-price for all three by now.

I neglected to mention that Thursday was Jennifer's birthday. I made a huge lasagna, and we had chocolate cake.

Ah, I see I've been kicked for the umpteenth frelling time this morning. Somewhere, a MasterCard was just declined.

Comments

( 22 comments — Have your say! )
laserbitch
Dec. 18th, 2004 06:32 pm (UTC)
Well, if you liked or even thought of seeing Hero, then you may be intrigued to wander out to the theaters to see House of Flying Daggers. It's the same director.

I'm going to see it tonight, and it looks absolutely beautiful. Just judging by how wonderful Hero was, I'm sure this won't disapoint.

But yeah, I don't go to many movies anymore, either. Last movie I saw in a theater was Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, and that was in the cheap theater.

At least at home you can pause and take pee breaks and stuff.
greygirlbeast
Dec. 18th, 2004 06:45 pm (UTC)
At least at home you can pause and take pee breaks and stuff.

Pausing for pee breaks is a good thing.
iliadawry
Dec. 18th, 2004 06:51 pm (UTC)
Blade: Trinity was largely what I expected. My favorite parts were Parker Posey and Ryan Reynolds, who manage a fair amount of lovely snark. I look forward to A Series of Unfortunate Events muself, as I enjoy the books a good deal.
greygirlbeast
Dec. 18th, 2004 07:32 pm (UTC)
Blade: Trinity was largely what I expected.

I had a lot of fun with the first two, even if Will Smith wasn't there to say, "Oh, hell no!"
happyspector
Dec. 18th, 2004 08:24 pm (UTC)
From what I've sampled of the old "Tomb of Dracula" comics, Will Smith might've just been a truer interpretation of Blade.
happyspector
Dec. 18th, 2004 08:20 pm (UTC)
"Why this doesn't anger me the way SFC's adaptation of LeGuin's Earthsea books does, I'm not sure. Maybe it's because I can tell that Proyas at least tried, and since Asimov is no longer with us, I know he can't personally be offended at how someone could so entirely pervert what he was trying to say."

That, and probably -- quite simply -- because it's something that can be enjoyed for what it is without accounting for what it came from. The Sci-Fi Earthsea, by all counts, was just an abysmal cauldron of steaming liquid shit.
greygirlbeast
Dec. 18th, 2004 09:42 pm (UTC)
The Sci-Fi Earthsea, by all counts, was just an abysmal cauldron of steaming liquid shit.

From what I saw, that first hour and seventeen minutes, that's a pretty fair description.
siliconedreamer
Dec. 18th, 2004 08:38 pm (UTC)
I'm actually really surprised you didn't like I,Robot a bit more. I found it to be a religious experience.

greygirlbeast
Dec. 18th, 2004 09:46 pm (UTC)
I'm actually really surprised you didn't like I,Robot a bit more. I found it to be a religious experience.

It was just too dumbed down and turned around backwards for me to be effected by it in that way. I wish it had. The transhumanist would-be-cyborg in me was deeply disappointed, the me that never gets enough of Blade Runner and cried so much (and publically) during most of A.I. that I've only seen it once. It just wasn't that good.
morganxpage
Dec. 18th, 2004 08:45 pm (UTC)
Slightly off-topic, but only slightly:
Is Tales Of Pain and Wonder still availble from Meisha Merlin? I only ask because I too wish to bog down your dial-up with another Visa order.

~Mikie
greygirlbeast
Dec. 18th, 2004 09:49 pm (UTC)
Is Tales Of Pain and Wonder still availble from Meisha Merlin?

As far as I know, yes. But there's a bunch of weird dren going on with MM, or so I've been given to understand, so I can't make any promises.
morganxpage
Dec. 18th, 2004 10:10 pm (UTC)
Thanks for the info

~Mikie
sfmarty
Dec. 18th, 2004 09:10 pm (UTC)
I find that going to the movies on a weekday helps a bit. The movie house I go to has wonderful popcorn. It shows third or fourth runnings of shows. Quite a lot of foreign films that don't show on TV. I manage to get there once a month, or so.

I am really happy that you found the beginning for the new book.

I haven't see I Robot yet. My Tivo seems to be stuffed with things to record. It can wait.

Did I tell you that I dumped Earthsea from my "to see" list? Great warnings from all of my friends. Thank you, thank you.
touch_of_ink
Dec. 18th, 2004 11:51 pm (UTC)
3 or 4 years ago, as I was driving in to work, I listened to an interview with the author of "A Series of Unfortunate Events" books. He said that he wanted someone like Alan Rickman to play Count Olaf, but was afraid that if the Hollywood Machine ever got ahold of his books, they'd pick someone like Jim Carey to play Count Olaf :)

In a more recent interview on NPR he tried to graciously pull back from that remark.
touch_of_ink
Dec. 18th, 2004 11:52 pm (UTC)
Oh, and if your disconnecting and slow speeds continue after Xmas, it's probably not Xmas shoppers, it's line noise. (Gods I hated teching line noise for dial up customers.)
setsuled
Dec. 19th, 2004 12:25 am (UTC)
Deacon and Emmie sitting together inside Kingston Station, waiting on the train that will take Emmie to Manhattan to visit Sadie.

Sounds like something I'd wanna read . . . It'd be nice to see Deacon and Sadie again. I wonder what Sadie's hand looks like now.

It took me forever this morning just to read the new installment of The Adventures of Boschen and Nesuko.

I seem to be getting hits at a faster rate than other times you linked to Boschen and Nesuko in your blog. I think people must really respect you going through dial-up to read it . . . Thanks.

Partly, it's fear of communicable disease. And partly, it's the realization that I enjoy most films more on DVD at home. But I am being sorely tempted by a few at the moment: Blade: Trinity, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, and The Aviator

I think it'd be really funny if you avoided seeing The Aviator because you were afraid of communicable disease.
greygirlbeast
Dec. 19th, 2004 01:18 am (UTC)
I wonder what Sadie's hand looks like now.

I've been thinking about that a lot. It's something I actually need to do some research on, the damage and the physical therapy. In this book, it's been eight years since her injury.

I think it'd be really funny if you avoided seeing The Aviator because you were afraid of communicable disease.

This has occurred to me.
floridacayman
Dec. 19th, 2004 01:17 am (UTC)
I'm not sure whether I'm interested in the Lemony Snicket movie because the kids don't look anything like their book counterparts. It's like if they gave Harry Potter lasik.

Michael
listeningowl
Dec. 19th, 2004 02:57 am (UTC)
"As we near frelling Xmas, my weekend dial-up connection gets increasingly lousy."

we have my iBook hooked up to broadband with the airport router and airport card, it is wonderful compared to dial up.
greygirlbeast
Dec. 19th, 2004 03:55 pm (UTC)
we have my iBook hooked up to broadband

I get DSL back on January 6th. After two years of DSL, a month of dial-up has been almost unbearable.
mehitobel
Dec. 19th, 2004 06:34 am (UTC)
Otogi 2: did Spooky beat the ship-smashing level? I'm stuck on it and have played through all the other available areas, and can't move on until I beat that one. I've played that stage at least a hundred times, and I've got to be missing some trick. At this point I'd be willing to enter a cheat code just to move on. I HATE being stalled in a game.

Sigh.

It's a great game, though, and few people know about it. Glad to hear someone else digs it.
greygirlbeast
Dec. 19th, 2004 03:51 pm (UTC)
Otogi 2: did Spooky beat the ship-smashing level?

Nope. Don't think she's gotten that far.
( 22 comments — Have your say! )