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Mabon 2010

Yesterday imploded. Or exploded. Doesn't really matter, because when the colloid of airborne solid and liquid particulates and gases had cleared, well, there was little left of the day to salvage. Nothing was written. Which makes yesterday a Lost Day. With only eight days remaining until we leave for the HPLFF, there's no time for days like that.

I forgot to mention that, night before last, I heard a coyote very near the house. I heard it several times, an oddly eerie sound. I'm still trying to get used to the idea of urban coyotes.

Today is Mabon.

The brightest spot to yesterday, the most silver lining (there were few of either) was the arrival of my author's copies of Haunted Legends, edited by Ellen Datlow and Nick Mamatas. It contains my story "As Red As Red," which I wrote in March and April of 2009. The anthology was released simultaneously in three formats: trade paperback, hardback, and a Kindle edition (though how anyone can read anything on a Kindle is beyond me*). This is a story I'm very happy with— sort of a footnote to The Red Tree —and I hope you'll pick up the collection, which includes a bevy of fine authors.

Please have a look at the current eBay auctions. They end today and tonight. Still no bid on The Wrong Things (2001), my collaborative collection with docbrite. These have become very rare, and I have only a handful of copies.

The rumours are true. The 2010 H. P. Lovecraft Film Festival is the last HPLFF, at least for the foreseeable future, as the director, Andrew Migliore, is retiring. You can't blame him; he's been doing this for fifteen years. Aaron Vanek has started a satellite festival in LA, so there will be that. So, yeah. Alas. The end is, indeed, nigh.

Last night, I watched the moon and Jupiter again.

To try to scrape something good from yesterday, late in the afternoon we drove to Warwick and got the new Swans CD, My Father Will Guide Me Up a Rope to the Sky, at Newbury Comics. This is the Swans minus Jarboe, but still. And we went to the market. And coming back home the sun was starting to set, and the clouds were on fire, and I wished I'd brought the camera.

The day ended when I took a Seroquel, that tiny reddish drab of numb, and fell asleep watching Avatar. It's becoming one of my comfort films, because it's beautiful, and it's heart is always in the right place— even when it stumbles —and in the end the humans lose and have to go back to their dying world. A bedtime story for panenatheists (I think I just made that word up).

---

The whole money thing is wearing me ragged again. Of course, at this point, I imagine it's wearing almost everyone ragged. The lifeboat is overcrowded, and we have the teabaggers wanting to punch a hole in the hull. Day before yesterday, I found this animated map— "The Decline: The Geography of a Recession" —based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (and other local unemployment statistics). It chronicles unemployment in the US from January 2007 (4.6%) to June 2010 (9.7%). It's sort of horrifying.

Anyway, yeah. I've reached the point where I'm considering asking my agent if she can get me another novelization deal. Frankly, I'd rather eat dog shit than go through that special hell again, but the money was good. Of course, there's no guarantee the money would be good again, and it would derail my actual, for-real, trying-not-to-suck writing.

Now, I need to make an end to this entry, then go find THE END to "John Four."

* Nothing personal, Kindle. I hate all "eReaders" and "ebooks" equally on principle.

Comments

greygirlbeast
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:02 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders

the words that are hyphenated for line breaks are still hyphenated even though they're in the middle of the line.

Reading that actually caused me physical pain.

And what the hell is a "nook" (aside from a cranny, or niche)?
myownpetard
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:09 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders
the nook is barnes & noble's version of the kindle

sorry about the pain!
greygirlbeast
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:14 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders

sorry about the pain!

I remember when typographers and bibliophiles lamented the death the art of typography, because of the switch from handset type to word processing, the birth of right justification. Well, eReaders that just dump text files into a new machine, without even bothering to reformat...this is the nail in the coffin. Or maybe it's the last clod on dirt shoveled into the grave.

A book used to be something artful. Not just a pile of data, not just a "good read" (*shudder*).
myownpetard
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:23 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders
i really really really hope that they'll start typesetting ebooks. i mean, they change the typesetting for trade paperbacks AND mass markets.

some books (house of leaves REALLY comes to mind) won't work at all with eReaders until they do something about that and about the lack of color.
greygirlbeast
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:27 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders

i really really really hope that they'll start typesetting ebooks.

As long as people keep settling for "the product" as is, in this economy, there's no incentive for anyone to try harder.

some books (house of leaves REALLY comes to mind) won't work at all with eReaders until they do something about that and about the lack of color.

I'm not even going to comment on the evil that a House of Leaves ebook would be. The title itself points to the necessity of pages...

And I'm not trying to pick on you. I just really hate ebooks.

myownpetard
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:32 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders
i know--not taking this personally. and i know how you feel--but at the same time, if no one picks up the technology it can never be improved. also, technology and art don't HAVE to be mutually exclusive. but i'm not keeping my hopes up these things will happen with eReaders anytime soon (or ever). meh.

what i really want is mediatronic paper.
greygirlbeast
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:35 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders

what i really want is mediatronic paper.

I think I've always been "over" the future.
myownpetard
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:40 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders
I think I've always been "over" the future.

and this is why we love you :D
grandmofhelsing
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:37 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders
The iPad has color, but it also has a standard backlit screen, so it tends to lead to eye strain. The Kindle and Nook both have "digital paper" screens that are easy on the eyes, but, of course, don't support color.

I thought I'd never switch to e-books, but I just bought a Kindle and became accustomed to it far more rapidly than I ever would have anticipated.

But there is one aspect of e-books that some people are just going to hate; they may turn the solitary activity of reading into yet another opportunity for "social networking."
greygirlbeast
Sep. 22nd, 2010 05:45 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders

But there is one aspect of e-books that some people are just going to hate; they may turn the solitary activity of reading into yet another opportunity for "social networking."

The mind dost fucking boggle.

And I fucking hate how people are so all-but-religious about their eReaders. "Oh, I could never live without my Kindle." Which didn't even exist three years ago.
from_ashes
Sep. 23rd, 2010 12:49 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders
I have the Nook and I read more now than I did before, which I didn't even realize was possible. Because it's a lot easier to carry around than a stack of books.

I also think that e-readers will give authors more freedom in publishing their own works. I have read some books recently I would have otherwise never heard of because they were offered in e-book format.

I honestly could not live without my Nook. I have always been a person, however, who had a book handy. It's the exact same thing. So when someone says they can't live without it, they're saying they can't live without reading. And I believe that's a good thing.

The future is going to happen, regardless. It's inevitable. The music industry is a prime example of what happens when an industry doesn't embrace technology. I personally believe the publishing industry is making a wise move by jumping on the e-reader bandwagon quickly (some not quickly enough, though). Because in the end, readers can find content free online without paying for it. And that screws everyone, including the author, the most.

Edited at 2010-09-23 12:50 pm (UTC)
greygirlbeast
Sep. 23rd, 2010 05:44 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders

I honestly could not live without my Nook.

...but, you did before.

The future is going to happen, regardless. It's inevitable.

If there were sentient dinosaurs, I'm sure they thought the same thing.
(Deleted comment)
greygirlbeast
Sep. 22nd, 2010 06:01 pm (UTC)
Re: eReaders

I have bound a few books by hand in my day. I particularly love sewing the signatures of pages together.

Now we're talking.