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Twitter loses another star.

Trent Reznor has decided to leave Twitter. You may read his reasons here. I'm mostly posting this because a) I'm a fan of NIN and b) I've now lost count of the people who've listed him as one of the three or or four people whose "tweets" I absolutely MUST start following or risk death by explosion or some such, and c) it articulates some of my own observations about the failure of social-networking sites.

Kudos for this quote: "Cutter's tip for my friends there: remember to cut along the length of vein, not across. Bigger payoff."

Also: "Anyway, we're in a world where the mainstream social networks want any and all people to boost user numbers for the big selloff and are not concerned with the quality of experience."

And this whole thing got me to thinking again, not so much about Twitter, but about how artists are perceived by fans, whether the artists in question are musicians or writers or whatever. I've reached the point where some people read Silk, which I wrote between 1993 and 1996, and they expect me to still be the person I was back then, still writing in the voice I wrote in back then, and, what's more, to resemble, in real life, various characters from the novel (usually whoever happens to be hisherits favorite). They learn I'm someone else, instead, and they get...weird. Or angry. Or bitter. Because, you know, writers and musicians and painters and dancers and what-the-hell-evers, we're all supposed to be bugs in amber, waiting patiently for someone to find us and identify with us, so that we may validate their existence.

Admittedly, near as I can tell, these folks are in the minority of my readership, thankfully, but they have megaphones.