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Now, not tomorrow, yesterday...

We are watching the world melt. We are watching Antarctica melt. In 2002, it was the Larsen B Ice Shelf. On this day, two years ago, I wrote about Iceberg D-16 breaking free of the Fimbul Ice Shelf. This morning, I read about the imminent collapse of the Wilkins Ice Shelf. The world is melting.

And I didn't write anything yesterday.

There have, however, been some truly marvelous suggestions come in from Sirenia Digest readers, in response to my call for suggestions. Sadly, many of them are a bit more like short-story suggestions than vignette suggestions. But still, thank you. One or two have real possibility. If you can make me flinch, I stand impressed.

So, what do you get when John Carpenter's Escape From New York (1981) meets the three Mad Max films (1979-1985)? You get Neil Marshall's Doomsday. As for Mr. Marshall, I really didn't care for Dog Soldiers (2002), but I liked The Descent (2005). Yesterday, Spooky and I made a matinée of his new film, Doomsday, which I liked very, very, very much. I went largely on the recommendations of Byron and robyn_ma, and I am glad that I did. Doomsday is a genuinely delightful post-apocalyptic romp from start to finish. I laughed. I clapped. I cringed. Marvelous. So many recent films, from Underworld (2003) to Ultraviolet (2006), have tried and miserably failed to do what this film does to perfection. Craig Conway pretty much steals the whole show as the wickedly vengeful Sol, turning in one of the most thoroughly charismatic villains since Clancy Brown's Kurgan in Highlander (1986). Oh, and his female sidekick, Viper (played by stuntwoman Lee-Anne Liebenberg), my gods, what a fine bit of eye candy. Rhona Mitra makes a nice XX-chromo version of Carpenter's Snake Plissken (in fact, she might even give Kurt Russell a run for his money), though she's called Eden Sinclair in the film. Those are the three performances that help make the film such a delight. But we also get serviceable work from Alexander Siddig, Bob Hoskins, and Malcolm McDowell (on autopilot, but, hey, it works). There was just really nothing about the film that wasn't fun. Loved the soundtrack. I think it was robyn_ma who said that Doomsday does what Planet Terror only tried to do, and, if so, she's right. This is a Grade-A B-movie, a grand, gory, beautiful homage to both Escape from New York and The Road Warrior. It's a blast, and you really ought to try to catch it in the theatre.

Oh, and I read two papers in the new JVP — "Ontogeny of cranial epi-ossifications in Triceratops" and "The skeletal anatomy of the Triassic protorosaur Dinocephalosaurus orientalis Li, from the Middle Triassic of Guizhou Province, southern China."

Every time I think maybe I'm getting the Second Life monkey off my back, I get sucked in deeper. Thank you, Lorne, for the following IM, which was so amusing I have to post it here (a parody of my own complaints following our rp on Wednesday night):

"Quit fondling me, mistress. I have a headache, 'cause I didn't bend space and time the way you're s'pose to, and nearly got sucked into oblivion by the third singularity that formed..."

And apologies to whoever I stole the icon from. It was just too fine for too me to pass up, and, you know, I do talk to wolves. Now. This is where this entry ends, I think.

Comments

( 33 comments — Have your say! )
cucumberseed
Mar. 28th, 2008 07:13 pm (UTC)
If suggestions are still being considered.
I did look out the passenger window yesterday at the embankment as I drove and saw the frost and grass undulate a little, which gave me the image of bodies underneath, writhing in the thawing soil.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 28th, 2008 08:24 pm (UTC)
Re: If suggestions are still being considered.
I did look out the passenger window yesterday at the embankment as I drove and saw the frost and grass undulate a little, which gave me the image of bodies underneath, writhing in the thawing soil.

Oooh. That's a good one.

Edited at 2008-03-28 08:24 pm (UTC)
mellawyrden
Mar. 28th, 2008 07:44 pm (UTC)
The world is melting & I hope scientists are inventing affordable jellyfish repellant. Regardless of saline content, pollutants & changig pH levels, those things thrive. Here comes the sea.
talkstowolves
Mar. 28th, 2008 07:52 pm (UTC)
Heh. That would be my icon. And I promise I won't mind if I could possibly get my name in the credit field on the userpic page. ;)
greygirlbeast
Mar. 28th, 2008 08:22 pm (UTC)

And I promise I won't mind if I could possibly get my name in the credit field on the userpic page. ;)

Thank you! Will do.
deekskusting
Mar. 28th, 2008 08:15 pm (UTC)
Sirenia 27
I've finally had a chance to finish reading. (I did not read the opening chapter of Joey Lafay - that is something I think I would rather wait until publishing).
But I have to say Untitiled 23, had a profound effect upon me. I have never in my life experienced the kind of flashback this tale has induced in me. While reading, there came a point where suddenly I was transported back to summer 1978 when I and several friends went newt hunting in the woods while plied on orange barrel. As I read, I could smell the smell of the woods, and taste the tinge of the orange barrel. I could hear the crunch of the underbrush, and the light wind. I could so easily picture the faerie girl chasing the lizard, for it felt the same as when we were looking for newts.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 28th, 2008 08:22 pm (UTC)
Re: Sirenia 27
But I have to say Untitiled 23, had a profound effect upon me. I have never in my life experienced the kind of flashback this tale has induced in me.

I am pleased, then, as this I am particularly fond of this story.

Edited at 2008-03-28 08:23 pm (UTC)
robyn_ma
Mar. 28th, 2008 08:16 pm (UTC)
Told ya. :)
greygirlbeast
Mar. 28th, 2008 08:23 pm (UTC)

Told ya. :)

Yes, you did. And you were oh so right.
(no subject) - robyn_ma - Mar. 28th, 2008 10:56 pm (UTC) - Expand
(no subject) - scarletboi - Mar. 28th, 2008 11:22 pm (UTC) - Expand
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scarletboi
Mar. 28th, 2008 08:54 pm (UTC)
I watched Sunshine last night. It really was sublime, and for once, I really prefer the ending they went with rather than the "alternate ending" included on the DVD.

Though it's always horrible when something bad happens to Cillian Murphy. I have a massive crush on him.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 29th, 2008 04:53 pm (UTC)

I watched Sunshine last night. It really was sublime, and for once, I really prefer the ending they went with rather than the "alternate ending" included on the DVD.

Agreed.
derekcfpegritz
Mar. 28th, 2008 10:01 pm (UTC)
HELL YEAH! Doomsday is the 100% Shizznit when it comes to purely over-the-top post-apocalyptic car-raziness!

I'd like to see a "post-apocalyptic" movie set in our world after the icecaps completely melt and everyone living along our shorelines is ankledeep in water and pissed off, while the rest of the world just kind of sits around as usual and says, "Tough. Buy a boat."
mr_earbrass
Mar. 28th, 2008 10:38 pm (UTC)
Really, really happy to be hearing good things about Doomsday. The trailer conjured all the comparisons you made, but such a mishmash could be either wonderful or awful and so I've hesitated...but no longer!

I agree with you on The Descent being better than Dog Soldiers, but I'll admit to having a fondness for the Welsh Werewolves. Low expectations helped, to be sure, but so did watching it with a group of slightly inebriated friends who, through brute force of will combined with an elementary understanding of the genre, predicted not only every plot 'twist' but also many a cheesy line. Normally such predictability would be a detriment, but that I managed to enjoy it anyway says something...I just dunno what. The creature design was right up my alley, though, as I feel most lycanthrope cinema veers too heavily towards either the whole wolfman/wolflady imagery or a big animal instead of a pleasing synthesis of the two. With a bigger budget, a better script and less macho military shenanigans the film would have been excellent--although I suppose then it wouldn't be Dog Soldiers!
furrylittleprob
Mar. 29th, 2008 12:13 am (UTC)
*wanders in*

I don't know who made the icon, but I know who made the base - http://users.livejournal.com/_palimpsest_/37065.html

*wanders back out*
greygirlbeast
Mar. 29th, 2008 04:54 pm (UTC)

Ooooh. Danke!
robyn_ma
Mar. 29th, 2008 01:13 am (UTC)
Oh, and:

'I think it was robyn_ma who said that Doomsday does what Planet Terror only tried to do, and, if so, she's right.'

Kind of. I said it does what the whole of Grindhouse tried to do. In brief, instead of somewhat pompously marketing itself out the wazoo as The Second Coming of Grindhouse Fare, as Grindhouse did, it just sort of came out and was content to be a grindhouse film. Also, I think Neil Marshall apes Carpenter better than Rodriguez did. Right down to the damn opening-credits typeface.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 29th, 2008 04:55 pm (UTC)

Right down to the damn opening-credits typeface.

Yes! I am so glad that someone else has watched early John Carpenter films frequently enough to have spotted that.
siouxdivision
Mar. 29th, 2008 01:20 am (UTC)
Suggestion
I don't know if you're still taking requests, but if you are, I'd love to read something by you set in the Wild West, something Peckinpah-ish/Blood Meridian-ish.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 29th, 2008 04:56 pm (UTC)
Re: Suggestion

I don't know if you're still taking requests, but if you are, I'd love to read something by you set in the Wild West, something Peckinpah-ish/Blood Meridian-ish.

I would very much love to do something Western. The only problem is the time required for the research.
reverendcrofoot
Mar. 29th, 2008 02:54 pm (UTC)
Two words, Zombie porn.
What zombies do when they aren't feeding on brains. Doesn't even have to make much narrative sense.

Question? Two thousand words = roughly ten pages, that is a short story right? But what do I know? I hate writing short stories. Something more than eighty pages to just shy of a hundred has been all I have ever been able to do. And you know what that gets you?

Absa-freaking-lutely nothing.

The business of being an author is so stupid. So I guess I'll be content being a writer.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 29th, 2008 05:01 pm (UTC)
Re: Two words, Zombie porn.

Question? Two thousand words = roughly ten pages, that is a short story right? But what do I know? I hate writing short stories. Something more than eighty pages to just shy of a hundred has been all I have ever been able to do. And you know what that gets you?

Well, different writers (and editors) have different definitions of "short story." For me, a short story is usually something in excess of 4,000-5,000 words (and usually more like 10,000-12,000). Longer pieces I call novellas. Anything over, say, 50,000 words, I begin thinking of as a short novel. But the vignettes I write for Sirenia, when I write vignettes and not actual short stories, those tend to be 2,000-3,000 words, just one scene. That's part of the challenge, keeping it short.
whiskeychick
Mar. 30th, 2008 01:45 pm (UTC)
as antartica melts, i have 7 inches of new snow here in the outskirts of Seattle at the end of march. the world is definitely topsy-turvy.
( 33 comments — Have your say! )