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"Magic is not respectable, Sir."

Yesterday, I wrote 1,097 words on "The Wolf Who Cried Girl" and found THE END. The story comes to 5,942 words, total. And I think I am very happy with the piece. Spooky loves it, and, increasingly, her reaction is my gauge of whether or not I've done a thing well. The story has been sent to Vince Locke to be illustrated. Anyway, along with my sf story, "The Pearl Diver," "The Wolf Who Cried Girl" will be appearing in Sirenia Digest #24, which should go out to subscribers on November 30th (unless I can get it out sooner). And if you are not a subscriber, that's a very easy thing to remedy. You know you want to.

And that reminds me. "In the Dreamtime of Lady Resurrection," a story that originally appeared in Sirenia Digest #20, is now online as part of the Fall 2007 issue of Subterranean Online (née Subterranean Magazine). Which means you may read it for FREE.

Yesterday, the postman brought me my contributor's copy of the Dark Delicacies II: Fear anthology, edited by Del Howison and Jeff Gelb (Carroll & Graf). Among many other fine stories, it includes "The Ammonite Violin (Murder Ballad No. 4)," which originally appeared in Sirenia Digest #11.

I did get in a walk yesterday, all the way to Freedom Park. The sky was filled with rainy-looking clouds rushing by overhead, the ground covered with wet fallen leaves and patches of green. There was only a hint of cold to the air. Later, after dinner, we read Chapter 6 of Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. So far, I am enjoying the book a great deal, and I find myself baffled at those I've seen complain about the style in which it is written, which I find fairly straightforward and brisk. Then, after Chapter 6, I gave up the next five hours to Second Life. I've been "good" lately, not spending so much time inworld, but it was something I needed last night. There was a brief bit of story in New Babbage, at which point I shifted into Fremen mode for the Dune sim. Our sietch was invited to visit House Corrino, an invitation that I, as Naib, nervously accepted. Later still, I found myself in the company (and at the mercy) of blu_muse in the post-apocalyptic supernatural free-for-all of Toxia. It was early before I signed off — about 3:30 ayem, I think, though I didn't get to sleep until 4:30 or so. Anyway, sometimes there must be fun. Oh, and, also last night, I made a new entry to the Professor's journal, regarding the birth of her daughter Elenore (who is also her mother). It just happened to be my 50th entry to that journal.

Okay. I think that's all for now. I have to spend today a) getting the layout done for the next issue of the Digest and b) getting started on the galleys for the 3rd edition of Tales of Pain and Wonder.

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Comments

( 18 comments — Have your say! )
unknownbinaries
Nov. 27th, 2007 05:51 pm (UTC)
So far, I am enjoying the book a great deal, and I find myself baffled at those I've seen complain about the style in which it is written, which I find fairly straightforward and brisk.

Personally, she seemed to go for a very Victorian writing style, and the beginning introduces a lot of people almost at once. Both of these things made it a bit difficult for me to get into it. I loved it once I did, though.
greygirlbeast
Nov. 27th, 2007 06:05 pm (UTC)

Personally, she seemed to go for a very Victorian writing style

She does, but it's in keeping with the period and feeling of the novel.
unknownbinaries
Nov. 27th, 2007 07:18 pm (UTC)
Oh, definitely, but it's also a style that frustrates the living hell out of me to follow.
blu_muse
Nov. 27th, 2007 05:58 pm (UTC)
Amazing. All that writing AND three virtual world stories at once? My mind boggles. Thanks to you and Spooky for the company last night. It was great fun getting to test out weapons and such. I learned many new tricks. Wish we weren't three time zones apart. I always forget how late it is for you two. You solidified Cerdwin's reputation as an angel-hater last night. Should be good fun to build off of in the future. Now I gotta go read about Elenore...
greygirlbeast
Nov. 27th, 2007 06:07 pm (UTC)

Amazing. All that writing AND three virtual world stories at once? My mind boggles.

Mine too.

Thanks to you and Spooky for the company last night.

No, thank you!

You solidified Cerdwin's reputation as an angel-hater last night.

She can abuse that little red-haired Celestial of mine anytime she wants. ;-)
humglum
Nov. 27th, 2007 07:44 pm (UTC)
She can abuse that little red-haired Celestial of mine anytime she wants. ;-)

She's even got my permission. That Celestial is a bitch...
greygirlbeast
Nov. 27th, 2007 07:54 pm (UTC)

That Celestial is a bitch...

Yes, well.
blu_muse
Nov. 27th, 2007 08:36 pm (UTC)
Feel free to IM Cerdwin with suggestions & requests... hahahaa.
greygirlbeast
Nov. 27th, 2007 10:21 pm (UTC)

Feel free to IM Cerdwin with suggestions & requests... hahahaa.

Oooh.

Wait. Do you mean me or Spooky? ;-)
blu_muse
Nov. 27th, 2007 10:47 pm (UTC)
eeek! I had meant Spooky. I'm almost afraid of what you'd suggest...
stsisyphus
Nov. 27th, 2007 07:07 pm (UTC)
I find myself baffled at those I've seen complain about the style in which it is written, which I find fairly straightforward and brisk.

I think the complaints may come from those who are not familiar with works which were written during the time the novel portrays.

Since this post was quite link-filled, and it is that most horrible time of the year, might we obtain a link to your amazon wishlist again...along with, perhaps, preferred T-shirt sizes for you and Ms. P?
humglum
Nov. 27th, 2007 07:43 pm (UTC)


Oh, golly. Wishlist time again...

We both like X-large t-shirts.
stsisyphus
Nov. 28th, 2007 07:44 pm (UTC)
Would that be XL for the innies or the outties?
greygirlbeast
Nov. 28th, 2007 08:05 pm (UTC)

Would that be XL for the innies or the outties?

Are you asking if she means M or F? If so, I like the euphemism.
stsisyphus
Nov. 28th, 2007 08:31 pm (UTC)
Yup, that is what I was asking.
greygirlbeast
Nov. 28th, 2007 08:38 pm (UTC)

Yup, that is what I was asking.

Then the answer is M, since they're usually roomier.
greygirlbeast
Nov. 27th, 2007 07:55 pm (UTC)

Since this post was quite link-filled, and it is that most horrible time of the year, might we obtain a link to your amazon wishlist again...along with, perhaps, preferred T-shirt sizes for you and Ms. P?

Well, since you asked, I'll slip it into tomorrow's journal entry. :-)
awdrey_gore
Nov. 27th, 2007 08:37 pm (UTC)
Clarke is a fine writer - her short story collection, The Ladies of Grace Adieu, was very much to my liking. But I suspect that is because, by their very construction, short stories are very brisk and to the point. I am no fan of Victorian literature and that is likely where I ran aground with Jonathan Strange.

Far more people loved Jonathan Strange than disliked it, so clearly this is a matter of taste as opposed to an indictment of the work itself. However, I can say that when footnotes impede my ability to keep the characters and plot straight, I have a hard time enjoying a book (But I still maintain one day I will finish House of Leaves). I also have to wonder if there is a very good reason conventions changed and writers started using more economic means of setting scene. Her descriptions of furniture seemed to go on forever. Before I gave up, I felt like I knew far more about the rooms the characters occupied than the characters themselves.

But if read solely as a period piece, I can see the allure. My problem is that word of mouth indicated the book was a ripping good sci-fi yarn, not a dense homage to Victorian writing conventions. I am a reader with very modern tastes. So that's probably why I disliked the book. It also should be said that I have been threatening to make myself read all of Dickens because sometimes being a modern reader makes me an undisciplined reader. The two should not be the same thing.
( 18 comments — Have your say! )