?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

I didn't find THE END of "The Madam of the Narrow Houses" yesterday, but I did do another 1,058 words on the story. It was a particularly difficult writing day, every word coming only after great resistance. I really must find the story's conclusion today. If only because it is already Thursday. Also, I will note that, for me, ghosts are the most difficult supernatural entities to write about well.

Not much else to yesterday, really. The writing. No walks the last couple of days, because I've been slacking off on exercise again. Bad me, I know. We went out to Videodrome last night about nine and rented Marcus Nispel's somewhat less than awesome Pathfinder (2007). I think Spooky enjoyed it more than I did. The alternating cyan and sepia color palettes seemed to render most of the action scenes incomprehensible to my eyes. And it's not often I'll say a film would simply have been better off had they skipped the dialogue altogether, but most of the dialogue was that bad. There were a few cool moments here and there, a few. Karl Urban was not nearly as interesting as he was playing Eomer in The Lord of the Rings, or even as interesting as he was playing Vakko in The Chronicles of Riddick. Anyway, as usual, your mileage may vary.

Oh, my contributor's copies of The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror (Volume 18; edited by Stephen Jones) arrived yesterday, which reprints "Houses Under the Sea." It sort of odd, getting a "year's best" reprint before I've received the volume the story was first printed in (Thrillers 2, released last December), but there you go. This is, by the way, my eighth appearance in The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror (my first was in Volume 9). Also, I got an email from ST Joshi informing me that the Penguin Classics title American Supernatural Tales, which reprints "In the Water Works (Birmingham, Alabama 1888)," is now available in bookshops.

Someone asked a while ago (and I never answered) whether I would be keeping an online journal for my Second Life Dune rp, as I recently did with Professor Nareth E. Nishi. The short answer is no, I won't. It was a lot of extra writing, keeping Nareth's blog, and I found that while it added considerable depth to the roleplay, it managed to take of lot of the fun out of it for me. Anyway, my Fremen character, Shahrazad, is all but mute and just shy of schizophrenic (there's a long story there), and I cannot imagine how she would keep any sort of a journal. However, there is a short entry for her in our Dune: Apocalypse wiki. It even has a "photo."

And I think that's all for now. The coffee is here...

Comments

( 16 comments — Have your say! )
sovay
Oct. 11th, 2007 04:39 pm (UTC)
Oh, my contributor's copies of The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror (Volume 18; edited by Stephen Jones) arrived yesterday, which reprints "Houses Under the Sea."

Congratulations!
cucumberseed
Oct. 11th, 2007 05:13 pm (UTC)
Awesomes on the anthology. A very deserving story, indeed.

Pathfinder I thought, was a miserable movie, stem to stern. I had high hopes - Vikings vs. Indians seems like it would be kind of cool (the story of the interesting 2/4ths of my heritage), but the dialogue hurt, and the time warp to the 80's for action movie tropes made me expect to see Jean Claude Van Damme or Stephen Segal pop up. Also, I think I might have lost my ability to tolerate mighty whitey in my advancing years.
happyspector
Oct. 11th, 2007 05:59 pm (UTC)
...

Mighty whitey?

...
greygirlbeast
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:09 pm (UTC)

Mighty whitey?

I assume we are speaking here of the trope of the white child lost among the "savages," rising up to lead and become the salvation of some beleaguered indigenous people or another? If so, yeah, I was thinking the same thing myself last night, though, also, I think Pathfinder was at least vaguely aware of the potential for racist implications in its plot and did make some effort to offset the inherent difficulty. I'm not really sure it succeeded, but at least Karl Urban's character does pass the "torch" back to his Native American lover. In the end, I'm not sure the film was either good enough or popular enough to deserve analysis on this level.
cucumberseed
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:12 pm (UTC)
Indeed. Sorry about the shorthand use. And no, it probably wasn't as bad as all that, but...
cucumberseed
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:13 pm (UTC)
Thus the origin of the term, apologies if I offend. I'm pretty good at it, sadly.
happyspector
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:31 pm (UTC)
No, I see no reason to be offended here (then again, I'm also pretty proficient at offending, so what can I say?).

The link narrowed the focus, thanks. I was wondering if you were talking about the general dated racial attitudes in otherwise kickass formative fantasy like Burroughs, Howard, and yes, Tolkein. Being well aware of such, I didn't get that vibe from Pathfinder at all. The film's flawed, but its presentation of racial attitudes aren't the problem, unless someone's just really in the mood to flex their White Guilt muscles. Honestly I thought it made a fine practical case for why someone with a Viking background would be uniquely suited to take them on, and offset this by showing that he couldn't have done it without combining such skills with the wisdom imparted by his Native elder. If anything, it was more annoying how both groups were so simplistically simplified, the good guys so syrupily good, the Vikings into such one-dimensional orc-like monsters.

(For the record, most American Indians I actually know are more annoyed to see their culture depicted as a bunch of squeaky-clean politically correct victims than actively offended by dated negative portrayals, though no, they don't like that either, obviously)
greygirlbeast
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:38 pm (UTC)

Being well aware of such, I didn't get that vibe from Pathfinder at all. The film's flawed, but its presentation of racial attitudes aren't the problem, unless someone's just really in the mood to flex their White Guilt muscles. Honestly I thought it made a fine practical case for why someone with a Viking background would be uniquely suited to take them on, and offset this by showing that he couldn't have done it without combining such skills with the wisdom imparted by his Native elder. If anything, it was more annoying how both groups were so simplistically simplified, the good guys so syrupily good, the Vikings into such one-dimensional orc-like monsters.

Thank you. You said that much better than I did.
cucumberseed
Oct. 11th, 2007 07:02 pm (UTC)
I don't necessarily think its a matter of guilt; I wasn't a fan of the portrayal of either side (happy little forest creatures vs. the Kurgan and a couple dozen lesser Kurgans), when there were a lot of ways it could have been much better done, which really left me disappointed.

In any case, I think I agree with our host that the movie doesn't really deserve the time and space we've already given it, at least, not on her turf. If you want to talk more about it elsewhere, though, it's a slow work day, so I'm game.
happyspector
Oct. 11th, 2007 10:25 pm (UTC)
I didn't mean to insinuate it as a matter of guilt on your part. As to what the movie doesn't deserve... You're probably right, but it does potentially serve as a useful jumping off point. That list on the link, by the way, is pretty entertaining... sometimes insightful, sometimes unintentionally comical (John Carter of Mars is an example? OK, archetypally true, but just a teentsie stretch for the thesis the compiler seems to be going for), at certain points actually giving things like an unexpected gravy splash (the description of KILL BILL is priceless... nothing that isn't more or less stated in the film itself, but still well summed up).
cucumberseed
Oct. 11th, 2007 10:31 pm (UTC)
I've been enjoying that wiki a lot. It's a good one to look at when you're bored.
stsisyphus
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:32 pm (UTC)
Someone asked a while ago (and I never answered) whether I would be keeping an online journal for my Second Life Dune rp, as I recently did with Professor Nareth E. Nishi.

That may have been me. While I find it unfortunate that we cannot follow along with your roleplaying adventures, it is certain none of our damn business anyway. And you've got plenty of platypus pacifying to perform presently. Humor me a moment, however; what is the origin of "al-Anwar", it sounds awfully damn familiar.
greygirlbeast
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:44 pm (UTC)

Humor me a moment, however; what is the origin of "al-Anwar", it sounds awfully damn familiar.

An Arab name, meaning something like "shining light." The prefix "al-" indicates this is the portion of the name known as the laqab, which serves to describe the person.
stsisyphus
Oct. 11th, 2007 09:01 pm (UTC)
An Arab name, meaning something like "shining light."

Poetically translated, perhaps, as "The Beacon". Hmm. I was aware of the arabic tradition of honorifics, the title just sounded familiar for some reason, though.
setsuled
Oct. 11th, 2007 06:58 pm (UTC)
what is the origin of "al-Anwar", it sounds awfully damn familiar.

You might be thinking of Al Anbar province in Iraq.

It's weird--another friend of mine has a character named "Faruja" in another RPG.
( 16 comments — Have your say! )