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Never trust a bunny.

Yesterday was an odd sort of day. We proofed "Highway 97." I e-mailed the corrections to subpress. Then we proofed pt. two of "The Black Alphabet." So, there I was done with work for the day. That is, done with the work that should have been done on Monday. And it was only 3 p.m. or so. I thought about beginning a vignette for Sirenia Digest #7, but my head just wasn't up for it after proofreading. So, I declared the day that rare beast, a half work day, half day off.

Spooky needed to pick up some glucose test strips for Sophie, so I got dressed and rode along. Afterwards, we went to La Fonda in Candler Park for a snack, chips and queso dip and fried plantains. Then we dropped by Books Again in Decatur. I found a copy of Reptiles and Amphibians of North America (1971) by herpetologist Alan E. Leviton. I probably wouldn't have picked it up, as we're out of shelf space at the moment, but I'm a sucker for books with associated artefacts. And this book had an envelope tucked inside, postmarked August 29th, 1973. It was from the book's publisher, Doudleday and Co., the invoice sent to the book's original owner, a Mr. S. Hutton of Atlanta, who'd purchased it via the mail. Spooky took some photos (behind the cut), because one day we'll move or this marvelous little bookshop will close.



The gratuitous exterior shot.

Inside, looking out.

Octavio, the shop's cat.

Yep, that would be me.


After the bookshop, we drove over to L5P (Little Five Points to non-Atlantians) and wasted time at Junkman's Daughter looking at clothes and tchotchkes and kitsch of all sorts. Oh, and all the Gothic Lolita books, which I adore, but, fortunately, not enough to buy. Junkman's Daughter is one of the last things at L5P that feels the way L5P used to feel, before the yuppies and gentrification. Afterwards, we drove up to Midtown for the 7:15 showing of The Proposition.

I'm really no good at movie reviews, so I won't try. But I will say that The Proposition (2005) is a frelling amazing film, just a few inches shy of truly and entirely brilliant. I'm talking Peckinpah, Joseph Conrad brilliant. It's both one of the best westerns (sensu lato) and one of the best postmodern horror films I've ever seen. It blends a relentless visual brutality with an unexpected understatedness, juxtaposing sudden and terrible acts of violence with a suffocating sense of solitude and desolation which perfectly matches its bleak Australian outback setting. Nick Cave's screenplay wisely gives the very best lines to John Hurt. There's a scene where an aboriginal man servant is discharged, and after he leaves the house, but before he exits the yard (an absurd attempt to recreate a lush Victorian garden in a dusty, sun-baked wasteland), he removes his shoes and socks and leaves them behind as he exits a gate in the white picket fence. As if to say, this is a land where men must adapt if they hope to survive, not a land that men can civilize and adapt to fit their own needs. And, for me, this moment seemed to be right at the heart of the film. Anyway, yes, brilliant, and you should see it on the big screen if possible, as the cinematography is superb. Here's a link to the film's website and the trailer.

After the movie, we had slices from Fellini's in Candler Park for dinner. Back home, because I really didn't want to go to face bed and my nightmares with The Proposition so fresh and undiluted in my mind, we watched Hoodwinked (2005). It's not a bad film, though I didn't really like the animation style. It tries too hard to be Shrek and never comes close. But it does have a few very funny moments. I think Twitchy and the singing goat were the best bits. And there you go. That was my yesterday.

I'm not quite sure what today will be. Writing, I hope. I want to get the next issue of Sirenia Digest finished up. I have some vague hope that there will be time between it and the arrival of the Daughter of Hounds CEM to get an actual full-fledged short story written. We shall see.

Comments

( 10 comments — Have your say! )
asru
Jun. 7th, 2006 04:41 pm (UTC)
I just had to do a double take - Octavio looks exactly like my cat. I checked though, and she's still asleep here, though she has been known to cross continents for fun.

I love those sorts of bookshops where the books fill every available space.
reverendcrofoot
Jun. 7th, 2006 04:55 pm (UTC)
Admittedly knowing nothing how it works, I like that last photo as an author photo or something similiar to it.
greygirlbeast
Jun. 8th, 2006 01:20 am (UTC)
Admittedly knowing nothing how it works, I like that last photo as an author photo or something similiar to it.

Unfortunately, our digital camera only shoots up to 300 dpi, which isn't quite good enough for publication.
setsuled
Jun. 7th, 2006 07:56 pm (UTC)
Anyway, yes, brilliant, and you should see it on the big screen if possible, as the cinematography is superb.

Ack, I'm jealous. I wanted to see The Proposition very badly, but I blinked and it wasn't playing around here anymore.
eldritch00
Jun. 7th, 2006 08:05 pm (UTC)
Oh, but that's a beautiful bookshop. It may look like the usual place over there, but if I show you secondhand shops over here, you'll probably cringe.

Also, I've long wanted to see The Proposition, but I'm pretty sure I'll have to wait for it on video. Incidentally, have you read Nick Cave's novel, And the Ass Saw the Angel?
greygirlbeast
Jun. 8th, 2006 01:22 am (UTC)
Oh, but that's a beautiful bookshop. It may look like the usual place over there, but if I show you secondhand shops over here, you'll probably cringe.

It really isn't easy to find good, cluttered, homey, well-stocked used bookshops in the South. There are two or three hanging on in Atlanta. I treasure them.

Incidentally, have you read Nick Cave's novel, And the Ass Saw the Angel?

Absolutely.
eldritch00
Jun. 8th, 2006 10:23 am (UTC)
Hmm...okay, thanks! I've had a copy for a while now, and I guess I should bump it up the to-read pile.
cailleach_beara
Jun. 8th, 2006 12:18 am (UTC)
Til Human Voices Wake Us
I totally adore Guy Pierce - have you seen Til Human Voices Wake Us, also starring Helena Bonham Carter? Another beautiful film.

And I thought The Proposition was fantastic -- and the soundtrack too! I walked out of the cinema quite shell-shocked. Alas, it was mostly overlooked at the local film industry awards (here in Australia) but then again that's the way with seriously good films in general. I'm quite sure it will be considered a modern masterpiece in years to come by the same people who found it 'too much'. Bah!

greygirlbeast
Jun. 8th, 2006 01:16 am (UTC)
Re: Til Human Voices Wake Us
I totally adore Guy Pierce - have you seen Til Human Voices Wake Us, also starring Helena Bonham Carter?

I have not, but I should.

I'm quite sure it will be considered a modern masterpiece in years to come by the same people who found it 'too much'.

Some of the negative criticism I've heard from US critics has been that it didn't go far enough re: its violence. I'm wondering if they saw the same film I saw last night.
bluharlequin
Jun. 8th, 2006 04:26 am (UTC)
Re: Til Human Voices Wake Us
I just got back from seeing the film and your final comment caught me off guard.
I didn't like the movie at all, but my beef was that it "wasn't enough."
I felt like all the characters were merely outlines, and not fully actualized, and that the arc of Guy Pearce's character rang hollow because of it.

A pretty film, however.
( 10 comments — Have your say! )

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