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Beware the vicious placoderms!

So, the insomnia is back. This time it's got its hooks into me and Spooky both. She got to sleep about 4 a.m. I followed sometime thereafter and then was wide awake at 9 a.m., after some asshole decided to rev his engine for five minutes out on Moreland. Further evidence I have not yet mastered head-explodey. Or, if I did manage to burst his cranium with the explosive power of my sleep-deprived brain, I never heard the sirens. There would be sirens, wouldn't there? Eventually? Anyway, there were wild dreams that are fading quickly. The discovery that the "Loch Ness Monster" was actually an extant species of giant placoderm fish, a list of deaths that had been wrongly attributed to drownings, glimpses of vast, fishy shapes beneath black water. I haven't had a Loch Ness dream in ages. Also, there was a bit in there somewhere that had me collecting fossils from a limestone deposit on a terraformed Mars. But, yeah, this is the second night of too-little sleep, since I only got about five hours night before last.

The writing went well yesterday. I did 1,187 words on "For One Who Has Lost Herself," which brings the story's total word count thus far to 3,472. I'd hoped to finish it yesterday, but it had other plans. Perhaps, I hope, today.

Er...what else? *blink* *blink* Oh, yeah. I neglected the mention in that list of things I've let pile up on me that I've agreed to write a Dancy vignette for a chapbook to accompany the sold-out limited edition of Alabaster (there are still copies of the trade hardback available). I may do that as soon as I've finished "For One Who Has Lost Herself." I sort of have something in mind, something that I'd thought would make it into "Bainbridge" but didn't.

I caught a documentary last night on the new basal hominid Sahelanthropus tchadensis ("Toumai"), a really marvelous discovery from the Miocene of Chad (6-7 million years old). Sahelanthropus might represent the earliest known hominine and may not be too far removed from the chimp/human common ancestor. The documentary managed to turn out decent despite the fact that some fool thought it would be cute if the whole thing were narrated by the disembodied voice of "Toumai" (who apparently sounded a great deal like the Travelocity Roaming Gnome®).

Also, Spooky's finished the latest faerie, Sweetgum. There are photos up in her LiveJournal. Have a look. This one is on beyond cute (but not for sale). She says she's doing a ghoul next. That one will be auctioned.

It occurs to me now that in reacting to accusations that my writing is "too dark" and that I do not "create from heaven’s breath," I might have overstated my case. In truth, I do believe that writing about the darkness, as a thing unto itself, not merely as a means of finding light, is an entirely legitimate endeavor and one that is too often neglected. There is a terrible, wonderful beauty to be found in the darkness, and those who never stop to examine and embrace the darkness within themselves will never truly know the light, because they will never know balance. And yes, I may have more darkness in me than do many others, but it's nothing I'm trying to hide from. This is the sort of thing I'm talking about, for example, when I say that it's wrongheaded to view Narcissa Snow as no more than a "villain," created as a foil to Deacon and Chance, Scarborough and Starling Jane and the Benefit Street ghouls. Looking back, I know that I love Narcissa as much as the rest, and not in spite of who and what she is or what she's done. I might say the same thing of Spyder Baxter. Or Jimmy DeSade. Or Odd Willie Lothrop (you'll meet him soon, don't worry). I'm at least as much a thing of the darkness as a thing of the light, and it's only right for me to say so and reflect that equity in my fiction. Anyway...

Time to make the doughnuts. But first, don't forget that a mere nine hours remain in the "choose your own letter" Frog Toes and Tentacles auction. As always, your generosity will be greatly appreciated. Which is to say, bid please, if you'd like such a sumptuous thing as the leatherbound edition of FT&T with a black velvet and red silk "cozy" sewn and embroidered by me and Spooky. The power of the "cozy" compels you.

Wow, it's sunny outside...

Comments

( 9 comments — Have your say! )
chris_walsh
Apr. 4th, 2006 03:35 pm (UTC)
the disembodied voice of "Toumai" (who apparently sounded a great deal like the Travelocity Roaming Gnome®)

This close to a spittake. THIS close to a spittake...

Nicely done, She Who Loves Humglum.
tactileson
Apr. 4th, 2006 04:06 pm (UTC)
those who never stop to examine and embrace the darkness within themselves will never truly know the light, because they will never know balance.

That's always been a motto of mine. I wrote something similar in my blog years ago, but I'm far too lazy to go dig it up now. I've always found beauty in darkness as much as in light. I think I kind of touched on that in the foreward to my little book, and it's also on my LJ profile. No one can really be whole unless they learn to accept both the darkness and light that are inherently part of them.
sfmarty
Apr. 4th, 2006 05:52 pm (UTC)
I have been thinking about your post yesterday. This person who says she doesn't like your work, yet reads your blog... Don't fret. Every word you write will be engraved somewhere in her memory. I once had an commuter who rode with me for years. She started out as a real bigot. Slowly, slowly she was turned around. One of the last times I saw her (I transferred to another job) she invited me to a party at her place. From the things she said, it became obvious that she was completely converted to sanity. Don't dispair, you are inadvertantly doing good works.

As for the TV special on "Toumai", I shall watch for it.
sovay
Apr. 4th, 2006 06:54 pm (UTC)
I'm at least as much a thing of the darkness as a thing of the light, and it's only right for me to say so and reflect that equity in my fiction.

So my brain is permanently set to Le Guin; sue me:

Light is the left hand of darkness
and darkness the right hand of light . . .
kiaduran
Apr. 4th, 2006 07:56 pm (UTC)
The first time I came across one of your books, Threshold, I picked it up, read the first few paragraphs. Read them twice more. Stood stunned in the bookstore aisle, realized that my mind all tingly, quickly bought the book and ran home to read and wonder. You are an original and amazing writer and I am so damned grateful your book was on the shelf that day. Can't imagine how spiritual poor my life would be if I hadn't "found" you. Don't ever let the doofuses of the world waste you time, energy and emotions.

chaoticvenus
Apr. 4th, 2006 09:58 pm (UTC)
the shadow knows..
"It occurs to me now that in reacting to accusations that my writing is "too dark" and that I do not "create from heaven’s breath," I might have overstated my case. In truth, I do believe that writing about the darkness, as a thing unto itself, not merely as a means of finding light, is an entirely legitimate endeavor and one that is too often neglected. There is a terrible, wonderful beauty to be found in the darkness, and those who never stop to examine and embrace the darkness within themselves will never truly know the light, because they will never know balance."

I love this quote, and I am curious (perhaps I missed it) who wrote that your writing is not of heaven's breath? What always amazes me about certain religious ideals , is the disregard for the shadow side. It's just not , well, human! It seems like they are only getting half out of life.And getting nothing out of reading your books I may add.. How do we appreciate the sunny days with out all the rain? In San Francisco, where we have broken a 1904 record for rainfall this March, we are waiting for that sunshine ( I am a bit envious you folks are getting some,) but I have taken the rain as a lesson to enjoy the balance and it makes me thing of Joy Division anyhow.
For every nitwit that makes these comment as too dark, too this and too that..you must fascinate them enough to keep them reading so they can make those insipid comments. It's something they are failing to see in themselves? Are they book reviewers? ( I am one too ) Are they thinking of the audience or is it that they are challanged by your prolificness? I find your writing to be the most amazing threads of thought I have encountered in years. I am excited to turn my friends onto your writing.I know that some art isn't always approachable and it doesn't always pay our bills but us , as your loyals will support you. Art stretches the mind.As it should be.

ps.I work for Good Vibrations (www.goodvibes.com) and am a book reviewer for them and and I am one of the folk that decides what goes on our shelves. (amoug other things!) I am always looking for great Erotic Novels and anthologies to put on our shelves and through the website. Any plans for more Erotica (books anthologies)? Can I put forth to our book buyer to perhaps carry "Frogs, Toes..."? I have also been looking for good werewolf erotica and so far what we have got is not quite the quality we strive for. I guess I am spoiled by you.Please let me know if you have a moment..

Again..Thank you!

Angelique
wishlish
Apr. 5th, 2006 12:53 am (UTC)
The insomnia
I have it too. I suspect mine is related from the disruption in sleep caused by Daylight Savings Time. Maybe you have the same?
greygirlbeast
Apr. 5th, 2006 02:30 am (UTC)
Re: The insomnia
Maybe you have the same?

Frell no. We've stayed on DLST for the past two years. That way, we get longer winter days, no disorientation at the shift, and I'm almost always an hour early for everything between October and April. :-)
wishlish
Apr. 5th, 2006 03:25 am (UTC)
Re: The insomnia
If I didn't have an office job, I'd try that. Maybe insomnia is a communicable disease.

Neat icon. Who is that?

( 9 comments — Have your say! )

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