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Addendum: MDS 7 and Others

We're a little late with February's Sirenia Digest Monster Doodle Sculpture giveaway. But without further ado, the winner of MDS 7 is Charles Porter! (insert celebratory noises here) And this month's monster is the gueir'dlöp, one of Nebari Prime's few venomous sea creatures. Gueir'dlöp are restricted to shallow, icy bays and inlets on a couple of the planet's southern continents, and the black spines along their backs are highly toxic. The orange stripes and deep blue underbelly act as camouflage, as the gueir'dlöp can most often be found waiting patiently in thickets of fire weed (which grows upside down from the undersides of large boulders), watching for unsuspecting prey. There are photos, of course, behind the cut:



Right lateral view.

Left anterolateral view.

Posterodorsal view.

Right posterolateral view.


Subscribe to Sirenia Digest today (or tomorrow, perhaps) and you too might win a Monster Doodle Sculpture. Plus, March's issue will include "Alabaster" and one of Ted Naifeh's illustrations for the story, as a sneak preview of...well...Alabaster, of course. By the way, the limited edition of Alabaster will be signed by Ted as well as by me. I just found that out this afternoon.

See you folks in the morning...

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Comments

( 10 comments — Have your say! )
mockingbirdgrrl
Mar. 2nd, 2006 01:49 am (UTC)
covet
he's so cute! and deadly!:)
sovay
Mar. 2nd, 2006 02:10 am (UTC)
the gueir'dlöp, one of Nebari Prime's few venomous sea creatures.

For being venomous, it's adorable . . .
cucumberseed
Mar. 2nd, 2006 03:15 pm (UTC)
Alright, that's cute.
And venomous. It's like chocolate and peanutbutter (especially if you're allergic to the latter)

Alright, I'm better now.
stsisyphus
Mar. 2nd, 2006 04:15 pm (UTC)
Yes, but Can You Eat It?
'cause it looks like it would be an awfully tough but perhaps savory little morsel wrapped up in seaweed and some rice. What is the scale on this MDS? Are they usually about this size (which appears to be about palm-size on most anthromorphs), or is this a juvenile specimen? I suspect the spines would be highly coveted by sects of aboriginal Nebari, although obviously difficult to harvest.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 2nd, 2006 05:37 pm (UTC)
Re: Yes, but Can You Eat It?
'cause it looks like it would be an awfully tough but perhaps savory little morsel wrapped up in seaweed and some rice.

The flesh is very bitter and greasy. Not good for sashimi.

What is the scale on this MDS?

It's about life-sized, 7 cm. from chin to tip of tail. This is a male. The females lack the dorsal spines and are much larger (14-21 cm.).

I suspect the spines would be highly coveted by sects of aboriginal Nebari, although obviously difficult to harvest.

Yes, indeed, on both accounts.
stsisyphus
Mar. 2nd, 2006 06:47 pm (UTC)
Re: Yes, but Can You Eat It?
The flesh is very bitter and greasy. Not good for sashimi.

Enough wasabi makes anything better.

The females lack the dorsal spines and are much larger (14-21 cm.)

Huh. I would have figured that the spines would have been more appropriate for the females, defense of young and all. Of course, I don't suppose there has been any mention of their ecology or social habits, so I guess that is a presumption that the females would protect the young. Anyway...
greygirlbeast
Mar. 2nd, 2006 06:58 pm (UTC)
Re: Yes, but Can You Eat It?
Enough wasabi makes anything better.

You have a point.


Huh. I would have figured that the spines would have been more appropriate for the females, defense of young and all. Of course, I don't suppose there has been any mention of their ecology or social habits, so I guess that is a presumption that the females would protect the young.


Nebari reproduction is tricky. You can't really look at it with too many terran expectations. For one thing, there's the need for two males to fertilize eggs, which is true for all animal-grade life on the planet. In this instance, the males employ the spines for sexual display and intraspecific combat.
stsisyphus
Mar. 2nd, 2006 08:36 pm (UTC)
Nebari reproduction is tricky. You can't really look at it with too many terran expectations. For one thing, there's the need for two males to fertilize eggs, which is true for all animal-grade life on the planet.

This has always been a logical sticking point for me. It seems an unusually problematic evolutional trait which would have been easily discarded in favor of traits which would lend itself to more facile procreation (single sire fertilization, or even asexual/hermaphroditic procreation). Although possessed of a figuratively powerful sexual instinct, the Nebari would appear to be at a disadvantage toward species with such a trait. It would seem that some other species with such a trait would have overrun the Nebari ecology. Of course, there was the matter of several millenia of nuclear, biological, and chemical warfare which pretty much wiped out all other competing species, which could account for this.

Of course, now that I think of it, if all Nebari fauna exhibit this "dual-sire" trait, there must be some extremely hardy, basic lifeform possessing this trait from which all of the more advanced forms on the planet evolved.

Made me answer my own question. Nice.
kennydoogs
Mar. 2nd, 2006 04:18 pm (UTC)
I notice you like the band Nightwish. I was just wondering if you've ever heard Lacuna Coil? If not, I HIGHLY recommend them. They are a band from Italy, goth/metal....very meloncholy...their singer, Christina Scabbia, has perhaps the most painful and beautiful voice I have ever heard.
greygirlbeast
Mar. 2nd, 2006 05:38 pm (UTC)
I notice you like the band Nightwish.

See today's entry.

I was just wondering if you've ever heard Lacuna Coil?

Of course. I love Lacuna Coil.
( 10 comments — Have your say! )