June 30th, 2007

Mars in space.

for you are so very choleric...

Monsieur Insomnia gave me a thorough thrashing last night, so today I am somewhat less than together and articulate. At 4 a.m., I finally took an Ambien. At 5 a.m., unphased, I took a second Ambien, and that finally put me to sleep, but I was awake again at (or about) 10:30, so, at best five and a half hours sleep. Fortunately, I had already planned for today to be a day off, which somewhat minimizes the damage done.

And yet, as it turns out, yesterday was a peculiarly good day. I never see those coming, and always they blindside me. There were two very welcome bits of writing-related news, which, unfortunately, I am not at liberty to divulge until next week (or so). Also, I wrote a very respectable 1,339 words on The Dinosaurs of Mars and finished the first section of the novella (which comes to about one-sixth its total length). It is going well, at last. I'll pick it up again on Sunday. I've not had a true day off since the 16th, which is what, thirteen days straight, which is quite enough in a row, thank you.

Last night's Kindernacht film was Mark Steven Johnson's Ghost Rider (2007), which was really pretty awful. With a different director and a different screenplay, there might have been something here worth seeing. It might have been fun. As it stands, the film never quite manages to find itself, and one is left with the distinct impression the target audience was, in fact, twelve-year-old redneck boys. Following the movie, we had an after-dark walk, and it was sprinkling, a cool, gentle rain, and there was distant lightning. Perfect.

After the walk we both had some very excellent Second Life, which included forty minutes at Brian Eno's "77 Million Paintings" exhibition/concert in Avignon at Art Center. The exhibition is also running at Ars Virtua in Seventh Eye, and will be ongoing all day today at both locations. This is a sterling example of what's right about SL, the wondrous things SL can be if allowed and if the brightest, most creative minds are not driven away by the negatives. And the whole experience is free. Not a single Linden is being asked of attendees. I also had a meeting last night with Sir Arthur in Babbage, and we figured out where the modest Phase I of the Palaeozoic Museum would be situated (downstairs at the Undershaw Society). I'll likely spend a good deal of my "day off" working on those exhibits. And again, at no point will the Palaeozoic Museum charge its visitors, though donations will be accepted. Anyway, yes, a very good day, and it's quite nice to go to bed not feeling as though the world has trampled upon you...even if Monsieur Insomnia then shows up to ruin your sleep.

Is that all for now? Yes, I think it is.