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Cold and sunny today. Currently, the temperature in Providence is only 24˚F, with the windchill at 17˚F.

Yesterday, on a sudden whim, and because I'd not left the house in almost a week, we went to a 1 p.m. showing of Gareth Edwards' Rogue One (2016). When I got got home, I posted the following to Facebook: "I absolutely LOVED Rogue One. Hey, George Lucas, *that* was the Star Wars prequel I waited so long to see. Wow. Just...wow. My face hurts from smiling." Except, I think I liked it more than that. Really, a wonderful film. I've been a fan of Edwards since Monsters (2010), though you may remember I didn't like his Godzilla reboot (2014). But Rogue One hits all the right notes, and it's an actual Star Wars film about the actual war, and it's raw and gritty and dirty and very dark. It is, dare I say it, brave. And Darth Vader has never been as menacing as he is in this film. In his review of the film, setsuled wrote: "Rogue One was designed to be more of a war film, a team war film like The Dirty Dozen (1967) or Where Eagles Dare (1968)," and yes, this is exactly correct. I would also name The Guns of Navarone (1961) and Force Ten from Navarone (1968) as important touchstones. The casting and acting were excellent throughout. I loved The Force Awakens, but I have to say that I actually think Rogue One is the superior film. Surprsingly, I wasn't really bothered by the CGI versions of Peter Cushing and Carrie Fisher, though that's the sort of thing that very often does give me the willies. Also, Rogue One stands as another example of the alt-right Nazi brigade's complete incompetence at orchestrating a boycott of anything.

Afterwards, we came home and I reviewed an errata sheet for Dear Sweet Filthy World, then sent my responses to those questions, along with Spooky's corrections, to Subterranean Press. And if you have not yet ordered the book, please do.

Today, I have to get back to work on "Tupelo."

On the one hand, news that Caitlin Jenner has accepted Trump's invitation to appear at the inauguration gives me one more reason to loathe Jenner. But on the OTHER hand, I get a joyous wash of schadenfreude thinking about how much it'll piss off the alt-right and many others of Trump's followers (who still don't know what they've voted for).

I have a photo from the theater, a view of the city to which I am not accustomed (4:36 p.m., view to the west, towards the Woonasquatucket River):



Resistencia, la paz y la compasión,
Bestia de tía

Comments

( 3 comments — Have your say! )
setsuled
Jan. 14th, 2017 08:15 pm (UTC)
But Rogue One hits all the right notes, and it's an actual Star Wars film about the actual war, and it's raw and gritty and dirty and very dark. It is, dare I say it, brave.

Yeah, it's sort of exhilarating, especially considering this came from Disney and that it was even the product of reshoots and studio tampering. I might put this next to Casablanca in the list of examples when studio tampering actually really worked.

And Darth Vader has never been as menacing as he is in this film.

Yes. I think they ought to make a Darth Vader horror movie.

I wasn't really bothered by the CGI versions of Peter Cushing and Carrie Fisher, though that's the sort of thing that very often does give me the willies.

They did kind of bother me--the scenes with Tarkin worked for me in spite of not because of the effect. Mainly Ben Mendelsohn's excellent performance kept me engaged and I really liked the sense of class rivalry between him and Tarkin. The performances, the cinematography, there was just too much I liked about the movie.
redheadedfemme
Jan. 14th, 2017 09:27 pm (UTC)
I liked CGI Peter Cushing more than Carrie Fisher, maybe because his scenes seemed to be more in shadow than hers. That made it more believable to me. Her shot was too bright, and that seemed to make it more artificial. Of course, when that person turned around and it was Princess Leia, that hit me for other reasons.
sovay
Jan. 15th, 2017 06:02 am (UTC)
But Rogue One hits all the right notes, and it's an actual Star Wars film about the actual war, and it's raw and gritty and dirty and very dark.

I know it had post-production reshoots and rewrites, and I agree with the assessment that structurally at least the first act is a mess, but it doesn't matter. The people are all who they need to be. The world is what it has become. You pass the last chance of the future hand to hand when that's all there's time for and you hold whoever is closest to you as the world goes up in flame. I spent a chunk of this afternoon recommending the movie to a friend of mine and realized as I said it that Jyn Erso is the first time in a mainstream blockbuster I have ever seen a female character with a Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca arc: it works. I am very glad not to have missed it in theaters.

I would also name The Guns of Navarone (1961) and Force Ten from Navarone (1968) as important touchstones.

Absolutely. I only realized the last time I watched The Guns of Navarone how much the original Star Wars had drawn on it for the Death Star, and so I was very glad to see the influence reflected and refracted back.
( 3 comments — Have your say! )