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So, on Monday we drove back to Providence (I almost wrote Birmingham; make of that what you will) to attend to various matters that needed our attention (the bank, mail, pharmacy, cats, etc.), and yesterday we drove back to Woodstock. We'll be staying on in the guest house at Neil's until after Xmas, probably until the 27th. The trip is about four hours each way, and there's a stretch in western Massachusetts, in the Taconic Mountains, that was blanketed in snow and heavy fog, both days. Beautiful, those snow covered forests, the drooping spruce branches and stark grey birches. I'd like the chance to actually explore the Taconics (known locally in Mass. at the Berkshires) someday, those peaks formed at the dawn of the Paleozoic, between 550 and 440 million years ago. Peering up from the highway, it was easy to imagine them sheltering everything from mastodons to wendigos.

I also returned with Lúthien, my iMac, having found it impossible to actually write on either my Asus or Spooky's Toshiba.

No real progress has been made on Alabaster: The Good, the Bad, and the Bird, though that's about to change. It has to change, because I have no more time left to dither. It's time, Caitlín, to write this, finish it, and move on to other projects. Which are waiting. Impatiently. My editor and I have agreed that the "ending" will likely be a cliffhanger, which is how I'm going to, inelegantly, solve the problem of having a story too long to tell in five issues. Over the next ten days, I have to make major progress, which will include cutting out and rewriting portions of #s 2 and 3. It's a nightmare. It genuinely is a nightmare.

Night before last, we finished The Newsroom, and I applaud Aaron Sorkin. The series was, I believe, genuinely too good, too smart, too truthful, and too earnest for television. But I'm very happy someone tried and that we got as much as we did. There was a fumble at the opening of Season Two, but recovery was swift and the rest was golden.

Here are photos from Monday, driving through Massachusetts:





3:20 p.m.



3:20 p.m.



3:27 p.m.



3:28 p.m.

All photographs Copyright © 2014 by Caitlín R. Kiernan


Anyway, I should get to it.

TTFN,
Aunt Beast

Comments

( 10 comments — Have your say! )
lemonlies
Dec. 17th, 2014 05:22 pm (UTC)
I love driving through that section on Massachusetts. I hope to go hiking out there some day soon.
greygirlbeast
Dec. 17th, 2014 06:01 pm (UTC)

I hope to go hiking out there some day soon.

That would be wonderful.
mataar
Dec. 17th, 2014 05:46 pm (UTC)
Really love these photos. They make me miss the northeast, even its bleak wintry season. Thank you!
greygirlbeast
Dec. 17th, 2014 06:01 pm (UTC)

You're very welcome.
sovay
Dec. 17th, 2014 06:56 pm (UTC)
there's a stretch in western Massachusetts, in the Taconic Mountains, that was blanketed in snow and heavy fog, both days. Beautiful, those snow covered forests, the drooping spruce branches and stark grey birches.

derspatchel grew up in western Massachusetts; he's climbed those mountains. They look beautiful under snow.

Edited at 2014-12-17 06:56 pm (UTC)
dipsomaniac
Dec. 17th, 2014 08:31 pm (UTC)
Hopefully having the iMac will help your progress. Bless Spooky for driving such a long distance. I love road trips but I hate driving. Thanks for the photos.
martianmooncrab
Dec. 17th, 2014 10:06 pm (UTC)
Its a shame you couldn't bring the kitties with you
eluneth
Dec. 18th, 2014 12:17 am (UTC)
Stunning, chilling photos. Mastodons and wendigos indeed!
hertston
Dec. 18th, 2014 05:10 am (UTC)
Quite an education from your photos. Never having been to that part of the world, I'd always visualized it as being mostly cultivated land where it wasn't urban; much like my adopted Devon and Cornwall. But there's still so much wildness there, real mountains and forests... wonderful.
kiki60
Dec. 20th, 2014 03:11 pm (UTC)
Mastodons
Actualy, you can find mastodon bone if your luck. Less than three miles from my current location. Someone found an extint whale. The whale bones must be collecting dust in some archive now. About twenty years back, some hunter found a single tusk laying half buried in the ground. They never found the rest of the mastodon (Wooly Mammoth?). They speculated that some hunters must have been dragging it home, and got tired, and dropped it. The freeze, thaw cycle must have brought to the surface.Lost by hunters, then found again by hunters, Ha!

Edited at 2014-12-20 03:14 pm (UTC)
( 10 comments — Have your say! )