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The sky out there could crush you. Fuck you, Autumn.

Someone asked a couple of days (or more) if I listen to the National. I do. I discovered them shortly after finishing The Drowning Girl back in 2011. In fact, I wanted to include a quote from their song "Anyone's Ghost" as an epigraph, and the band was cool with it, but the record company wanted some exorbitant fee, so it didn't happen.

Yesterday was a better day, and sometimes that's the best I can hope for.

Speaking of The Drowning Girl, I have a second Perrault painting-in-progress from Matthew Jaffe. This time, "Night in the Forest":



The Centipede Press edition is coming together.

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I'm pounding at the front door of Cherry Bomb. Yesterday I wrote...I don't know. I bunch of words. Doesn't much matter because I tossed them all out. Later, not writing, I might have figured out the beginning. The last thing I want to be doing just now is writing this book.

Now that I have something sort of CEM-like for Pink Delicious, I need to get to work on that as well. Which I especially don't want to be doing. It's not truly a copyedited ms. It's a print-out of the MS Word document I was emailed, with all the marginal/tracked/whatever stuff that should be in red printed in B&W. Marks with a red pencil? Easy to see. These "marks"? Much less so. For Cherry Bomb, I'm going to offer to pay for the cost of producing a genuine CEM. I'm not trying to be difficult. But I want a copyedited ms. I can work with. A hard copy someone has marked up by hand. Yesterday, my editor informed me those sorts of CEMs don't exist anymore, that everything the copyeditors do is done in track changes now.

And I replied that I would quit publishing, if that were an option. But that's been true for at least a decade. This is just the latest round of "shit can always get worse." It all becomes ever less physical, less real, the process of making books and reading books, become ever less tactile, more and more consigned to tablets and "readers" and most people seriously don't seem to mind.

Civilization, culture, art...it was all inherently ephemeral to begin with. This digital age is rendering culture so insubstantial and transitory that I'm afraid I'd be overly generous to call it fleeting.

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The roughs for the final installment of Alabaster: Boxcar Tales just hit my email. Weird.

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In the chaos and monotony, I've been seeking comfort in old, familiar films. Night before last, To Have or Have Not (1944) and Woman of the Year (1942). Last night, The Philadelphia Story (1940). The forties are easy on my eyes and my mind. Also, The Philadelphia Story is very likely the best of Shakespeare's comedies that Shakespeare didn't write.

Don't Fall On Me,
Aunt Beast

Comments

( 12 comments — Have your say! )
martianmooncrab
Sep. 24th, 2013 05:44 pm (UTC)
that everything the copyeditors do is done in track changes now.

if Stephen King wanted paper, he would get it delivered on a silver platter..
greygirlbeast
Sep. 24th, 2013 05:58 pm (UTC)

Yup.
pisceanblue
Sep. 24th, 2013 06:05 pm (UTC)
Also, The Philadelphia Story is very likely the best of Shakespeare's comedies that Shakespeare didn't write.
Having stated it thus, I immediately apprehend your meaning in terms of the script's structure (not sure if it was taken directly from the play) but I'd never considered it before; thank you, Aunt Beast. The Philadelphia Story and Vertigo are my two all-time favorites.

Edited at 2013-09-24 06:05 pm (UTC)
greygirlbeast
Sep. 24th, 2013 06:07 pm (UTC)

You're welcome. I'd love to write an essay on this, but I know I never will.
Steven Barritz
Sep. 24th, 2013 06:18 pm (UTC)
Don't know if you heard about this, but thought you'd find it interesting. I know you are a fan of The Orange Eats Creeps. Two Dollar Radio, the publisher of that book, is going into micro-budget films, one of the three films they're doing is going to be directed by Krilanovich.
greygirlbeast
Sep. 24th, 2013 06:33 pm (UTC)

Two Dollar Radio, the publisher of that book, is going into micro-budget films, one of the three films they're doing is going to be directed by Krilanovich.

Well, that could be cool.
setsuled
Sep. 24th, 2013 06:39 pm (UTC)
a second Perrault painting-in-progress from Matthew Jaffe. This time, "Night in the Forest":

Very nice.

The forties are easy on my eyes and my mind.

I know what you mean. I start to feel really off-balance if I go too long without seeing a movie made before 1960.
greygirlbeast
Sep. 24th, 2013 07:35 pm (UTC)

I start to feel really off-balance if I go too long without seeing a movie made before 1960.

Which is what I let happen the last few months.
aarongp
Sep. 24th, 2013 09:41 pm (UTC)
I love that painting. The shadows and darkness are exquisite.

This digital age is rendering culture so insubstantial and transitory that I'm afraid I'd be overly generous to call it fleeting.
With the amount of dog shit being produced these days, this might be kind of a useful thing, to a certain degree.
But yes, I do see your point and I concur.

The forties are easy on my eyes and my mind.
So well said. Think I might have to dig something out to watch again. A Houston sounds good. The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre perhaps. Haven't seen those steenking badges for a while.
sovay
Sep. 25th, 2013 12:29 am (UTC)
This time, "Night in the Forest"

He's a very, very good Albert Perrault.
greygirlbeast
Sep. 25th, 2013 01:35 am (UTC)

He is that.
ulffriend
Sep. 29th, 2013 01:28 pm (UTC)
That's a perfect description of "The Philadelphia Story".

I also don't like using the "track changes" feature - personally, I'm more likely to miss something in the mess that it makes of page than I am looking had hand edits. Of course, when I was a journalist I wrote for one of the last newspapers that used waxed paper copy and exacto knives to make the pages. Old habits die hard.
( 12 comments — Have your say! )